The Home of the Mighty Maetae

The day before Cap’n Jack and I were dragged up Tinto by our “security” I, in my infinite wisdom, thought it would be a jolly good wheeze to get a feel for how the pups might behave on the open hill.  The weather was fine, the sky was clear and The Labrador Security Co was busy ripping up the back garden.  As I watched their foray into demolition I noticed, in the distance, the distinctive shape of Dumyat, that wee bump at the west end of the Ochil Hills overlooking Stirling.  Hmm…that should be ok for my first solo venture with the pups.  I know…but it seemed a good idea at the time.

Here’s a little photographic story of our ascent

We're about to go for a walk, The Labrador Security Co and me.  We can even see where we're going from our back garden.  See that little pimple just to the left of the red roof (centre shot)?  That's mighty Dumyat.  We'll be at the car park at the back of the hill in about half an hour's time.

We’re about to go for a walk, The Labrador Security Co and me. We can even see where we’re going from our back garden. See that little pimple just to the left of the red roof (centre shot)? That’s mighty Dumyat. We’ll be at the car park at the back of the hill in about half an hour’s time.

OK - a bit closer this time so you can get a better look at the wee pimple.

OK – a bit closer this time so you can get a better look at the wee pimple.

...and so it begins all over again but twice as difficult.

…and so it begins all over again but twice as difficult.

The Wallace Monument

The Wallace Monument

The pups can be hard work when walking them on leads - especially when they start to drag their heels.  Evidence of my efforts to get them moving can be found in the rocks!

The pups can be hard work when walking them on leads – especially when they start to drag their heels. Evidence of my efforts to get them moving can be found in the rocks!

"It's this way.""No...it's this way I tell you."

“It’s this way.”
“No…it’s this way I tell you.”

Miss Blonde and (the very colourblind) Miss Pink guard the summit trig point.

Miss Blonde and (the very colourblind) Miss Pink guard the summit trig point.

Here we have a memorial stone, a steel basket in which to light a warning beacon.  Also, very surprisingly, Lionel Messi of Barcelona - and a disembodied head (left of shot)

Here we have a memorial stone, a steel basket in which to light a warning beacon. Also, very surprisingly, Lionel Messi of Barcelona – and a disembodied head (left of shot)

The shiny buildings this side of the River Forth are whiskey bonds; the smaller rectangular buildings on the opposite side are the remains of the magazines that were part of the (long gone) Royal Navy Depot at Throsk.  My grandpa used to drive the little train that ferried "stuff" around the base.

The shiny buildings this side of the River Forth are whisky bonds; the smaller rectangular buildings on the opposite side are the remains of the magazines that were part of the (long gone) Royal Navy Depot at Throsk. My grandpa used to drive the little train that ferried “stuff” around the base.

The haze means that we can't quite see Stirling Castle in the background (centre left) however we can just make out Wallace Monument (centre background).  The big outcrop, with its commanding view over the Forth Valley is home to an old hill fort, home of the     who occupied the site at the time of the Roman invasion.  In the foreground is what might loosely be termed a mad bugger on a bike!

The haze means that we can’t quite see Stirling Castle however we can just make out Wallace Monument (centre background). The big outcrop, with its commanding view over the Forth Valley is home to an old hill fort; home of the mighty Maetae, the tribe who occupied the site at the time of the Roman invasion.  Dumyat comes from Dun Maetae – fort of the Maetae.   In the foreground is what might loosely be termed a mad bugger on a bike!

Looking down from the summit I can see the hordes coming up the Dumyat motorway (far left).  Fortunately there is a little used trail heading off to the right which will allow us to sneak past

Looking down from the summit I can see the hordes coming up the Dumyat motorway (far left). Fortunately there is a little used trail heading off to the right which will allow us to sneak past

My "let's avoid the ascending hordes"  alternative route gives a not often seen perspective on the Dumyat summit

My “let’s avoid the ascending hordes” alternative route gives a not often seen perspective on the Dumyat summit

Good news – the pups behaved (more or less) impeccably.  Most impressive was their calm descent on a steep path just sitting on my heel with no pulling on the leads. All I need now is a miracle with my sciatic right leg 😆 .

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8 thoughts on “The Home of the Mighty Maetae

  1. The Ochils often catch my eye as I’m heading north to the Highlands. Dumyat – fine name for a hill that – looks a rather nice spot. Complete with football superstars as well. Good to see them out and about mixing with the people

    • Dumyat is one of those hills that if you drive around the back there is very little ascent required. Everybody and their granny tackles this one. The views are good though.

    • It’s a rather nice, if busy, spot. We’re fortunate enough to have lots of good viewpoints not too far away. The Stirling Uni campus has a great setting…and to think you were only 5 minutes away from the start of this walk! 😀

    • Ah…next! Hmm, the jury’s out on that one Paul. There’s lots of time as the pups are still young. At the minute my right leg is becoming increasingly “sciatic” courtesy of the effects of the pups’ early lead work.

      At the minute major hills are beyond me. We’re walking between 5 and 6km a day on local trails but even that is annoying the legs. The two recent hillwalks went ok especially the second to Tinto but both walks were very easy as hillwalks go. I’m not sure if I’ll be back up on the bigger summits this time…I think we’ll have to make do with lower tracks and trails. But you never know we may just… 😆

    • There was a lot of shouting, well screaming really, but we got there. They did really well as I tackled a steep descent from the summit with both on short leads…worked amazingly well considering their age. We just dropped down with both sitting on my heels. The alternative was to take the tourist route back with the hordes coming up the way…and risk having both arms pulled from their sockets as the gruesome twosome charged the oncoming masses.

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